Humorous Guide to Good Parenting

Do you appreciate sardonic or sarcastic humor? This piece is full of it. Read this Humorous Guide to Good Parenting. The intro line is a humdinger… “Do you wish to raise a happy, balanced, reasonable, unpretentious contributor to society? Or a nightmarish idiot? Make your decision and read on …”

Humorous Guide to Good Parenting.

Andy West has written a pointed, yet fairly accurate verbal picture of … PARENTS.

This piece appears in The Independent, an online publication out of London on Derry Street, which includes Independent Voices.

Keep your heart, mind, and funny bone open as you read on…

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Humorous Guide to Good Parenting

“The Non-Parent’s Guide to Good Parenting”

“The latest nonsense research into middle class parenting by a pointless charity would seem to show that a “staggering” 87 per cent of dads are not the main bedtime story readers to their spawn. I am not staggered. It struck me only last weekend, in a trendy pizza restaurant, that most fathers are hopelessly inept and most mothers tiresomely indulgent when it comes to parenting.”

Strong words…

“All parents, take note: Being a parent does not make you an expert in the art of parenting. There are enough abused children to prove the fact. Allow me then, to offer you the benefit of my inexperience. This is Andy West’s non-parent’s guide to parenting.”

Fighting words!

“EDUCATION”

“There seems to be some confusion surrounding the need to educate a child before school-age.”

“If you would like your son or daughter to be happy, balanced, reasonable, unpretentious and relaxed then I suggest spending time reading to them, chatting to them, discussing their early interests and lives and generally helping them to interact with the outside world. This …”

Read more about…

  • Discipline
  • Safety
  • Behavior
  • Conversation
  • Sex-Education
  • Bed-Time, and
  • Exercise

Just click this link to go to the original piece…

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This piece, a Humorous Guide to Good Parenting is sharp sarcastic humor mixed with the reality of a great many parents methods for raising children. After you stop being offended, or laughing, you may want to take note. For material to be offensive, or funny, there must be a thread of truth in it. There is truth here.

To Your Parenting Success!

Do You have an opinion? Please leave your questions, ideas, answers, and comments below, or send an email to… SuccessfulParentingSolutions@gmail.com

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How to Raise Kids on a Budget

How to Raise Kids on a Budget? This is a question better answered in parcels. Brad Tuttle, a reporter at TIME, wrote a piece in the Moneyland section of the website. This website section specializes in ‘Financial Insights from Your Wallet to Wall Street.’ This piece restates the Department of Agriculture’s figure on the cost of raising children. It further reports that the more money you make, the more it will cost to raise each child. Go to the bottom of this post and there is a Link to Family Budget Tips. Peruse the excerpt from TIME online below.

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How to Raise Kids on a Budget

How to Raise Kids on a Budget

“Million Dollar Babies: What It Really Costs to Raise a Child”

“Last week, the Department of Agriculture announced that the cost of raising a child is now estimated to be $234900. The fact that this figure represents an all-time high …”

“There are many reasons why the $235K number doesn’t represent the full expenditure of having a kid. First off, the USDA’s statistics are based on the cost of raising a child only through the age of 17. Unless your child is the rarest of prodigies, he or she won’t have a college degree by then.”

“What’s more, the $235K figure is what a middle-income family, with annual income between $59,410 and $102,870, is expected to spend. Families that earn over that range can anticipate spending an average of $389,670 from the birth of their child through age 18. Again, that doesn’t include college.”

““The real costs of raising a child for a moderate-income family”—including forgone income, college for those who attend, and the so-called opportunity cost of not investing the money—”would be closer to $900,000 to age 22 than the reported $300,000 expenditures to age 18,” says John Ward, an economist and the president of John Ward Economics, based in Prairie Village, Kan., which consults on legal disputes for plaintiffs and defendants.”

The source is TIME – Moneyland online

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It always seems as if there are more questions than there are answers. Just How to Raise Kids on a Budget is fraught with worry. But don’t. In relation to this Piece in TIME, what about those of us who do not fit into either of those income ranges? Get the information that you need and then make adult decisions the best you can.

To start you on your information gathering way… I have a free eBook for you that just may have the right tips to help with the Family Budget. It is entitled, ‘Family Budget… Demystified.’ Here is the Link to that webpage.

The Family Budget – eBook

To Your Parenting Success!

Do You have an opinion? Please leave your questions, ideas, answers, and comments below, or send an email to… support@parenting101success.com

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Between Aging Parents and Your Teenager

Kathryn Haslanger’s piece appears in the Huffington Post. She is the Senior VP for Community Benefit and External Affairs, VNSNY. She talks about How to Deal with being between Aging Parents and Your Teenager’s Needs, including the issues that arise. Go to the source. This is a good one.

How to Deal with being between Aging Parents and Your Teenagers Needs

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How to Deal with being between Aging Parents and Your Teenager’s Needs

How to Deal with being between Aging Parents and Your Teenagers Needs“A Family Caregiver’s Guide to Coping With Teenagers”

“If you are a family caregiver of an elderly parent and you still have teenagers at home, you may be accustomed to such complaints. You are busy meeting your …”

“Most of the family caregivers who find themselves “sandwiched” between two different generations — caring for both at once — are women. In fact, the Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates that there are roughly 20 million women in the “sandwich generation” and that they devote 2.4 billion hours of their time to their children and their elderly parents each year.”

“According to a study on “The Cluttered Nest” by researchers at the University of Nebraska, people of the sandwich generation worry about their duty to their own children versus their duty to their parents. They worry about their family’s financial and physical resources, spreading themselves too thin, and their own ability to cope with what faces them.[3] So how can a family caregiver, who is already stretched to the limit with caregiving responsibilities, handle the often unending demands placed on them by their teenager(s)? Here are some tips that might work in tidying up your “cluttered nest”:”

Source

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How are you coping being the ‘sandwich generation?’ How to Deal with being between Aging Parents and Your Teenager’s Needs? The generation between being the caretaker of your aging parents and still have teenagers at home. Someone will feel neglected. Is it you?

Here is a Link to the article, “The ‘sandwich generation’: women caring for parents and children.”    (http://www.bls.gov/opub/mlr/2006/09/art1full.pdf)

Here is a Link to a study write-up, “The Sandwich Generation: A Cluttered Nest.”    (http://digitalcommons.unl.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1560&context=extensionhist)

To Your Parenting Success!

Do You have an opinion? Please leave your questions, ideas, answers, and comments below, or send an email to… support@parenting101success.com

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Seeking the Good Parent

Seeking the Good ParentIn Seeking the Good Parent, I ran across a great piece in the New York Times.

CATHERINE RAMPELL has written a piece in the ‘New York Times – Business” Section under ‘Economix – Explaining the Science of Everyday Life’ titled “Good Parent, Bad Parent.” There are two excerpts further along in this post. This is a very interesting article.

This piece talks about the economy, and its role in Successful Parenthood, and the Good Parent or Bad Parent.

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Seeking the Good Parent

“A couple of top-notch economists, however, suggest that wealth, rather than cultural mores, is the bigger determinant of successful parenthood. In an essay written for the WK Kellogg Foundation, Sendhil Mullainathan of Harvard and Saugato Datta of …”

Click here to visit the original source of this post

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Seeking sthe Good ParentAs always, the New York Times presents interesting and thought provoking material. The Good Parent is hard to find. Now I understand even more deeply that the economy and family stability are forever linked. Though I know that the current economic environment influences the family as a whole, I did not look at this factor from this prospective. Catherine Rambell presents this short piece with an excerpt from two “top-notch economists.” This bares further reading and thought.

I have added the topic of ‘How the Economy is related to Parenting’ to my searches for relevant material. Economic times are difficult for most and disastrous for some.

To Your Parenting Success!

Do You have an opinion? Please leave your questions, ideas, answers, and comments below, or send an email to… SuccessfulParentingSolutions@gmail.com

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