Intensive Parenting

Mother the Good Parent Characteristic is Intensive Parenting. I think not! Alice G. Walton, a contributor to Forbes online, specializes in covering health, medicine, psychology, and neuroscience has something wise to say about it. She received her Ph.D. in Biopsychology at CUNY’s Graduate Center in New York City. She reports from a study entitled, ‘Insight into the Parenthood Paradox: Mental Health Outcomes of Intensive Mothering.’ The coauthors are Kathryn M. Rizzo, Holly H. Schiffrin and Miriam Liss. This study was published in the Journal of Child and Family Studies, Online First™ on June 29, 2012. It can be purchased online as an individual article in electronic format only. The charge is $34.95 USD. Here is a Link to that website… http://www.springerlink.com/content/q4g020t496534311/?MUD=MP

This study may be available elsewhere; I did not do any further research. As always, do your due diligence. The excerpt and the Link to Dr. Walton’s piece are below.

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Mother the Good Parent Characteristic is Intensive Parenting

 Mother the Good Parent Characteristic is Intensive Parenting“The ‘Better’ Mother? How Intense Parenting Leads To Depression”

“A smart new study looks at how mothers’ attitudes about parenting affect their mental well being …”

“… the authors used five factors to encapsulate it well:

• Essentialism is the feeling that mothers, over fathers, are the more “necessary and capable” parent.

• Fulfillment in parenting is defined by beliefs like “a parent’s happiness is derived primarily from their children.”

• Stimulation is the idea that you, the mother, should always provide the best, most intellectually stimulating activities to aid in your child’s development.

• Challenging is, as you might guess, the idea that parenting is just about the most difficult job there is (participants ranked statements like, “It is harder to be a good mother than to be a corporate executive”).

• And Child-Centered refers to the idea that kids’ needs and wants should always come before your own.”

“It’s so easy to feel that every little thing we do will have a make-or-break effect on our kids’ development or success in life. But it’s important to remember that this just isn’t true. Putting our own mental health right up there with our kids’ – perhaps even first – is probably the best way to go. Since kids are so highly intuitive, working on own happiness and mental health is the best thing we can do – though it’s easier said than done, it’s probably the best legacy we can leave.”

Forbes is the Source

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Unless you are anticipating doing further research in this area, it isn’t necessary to purchase a copy of this study. Dr. Walton has done a superb job in summarization, explanation, and descriptions. She also gives her opinion, which seems to be done to earth and practical. So… Mother the Good Parent Characteristic is Intensive Parenting, not! Finding balance in all areas of life tends to build a strong foundation for success.

To Your Parenting Success!

Do You have an opinion? Please leave your questions, ideas, answers, and comments below, or send an email to… support@parenting101success.com

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